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15 Days Kung Fu Warriors Intensive Fight Camp in Thailand

15 Days Kung Fu Warriors Intensive Fight Camp in Thailand

  • 116 M5, T. Mae Na Toeng, Pai, Mae Hong Son 58130, Thailand

Kung Fu Warrior Fight Camp in Pai, Thailand

Come and enjoy 2 weeks at the awesome Kung Fu Retreat in Northern Thailand training with the ‘Nam Yang Warriors’ professional fight team. This is an exciting experience carefully planned for ambitious competitive fighters looking to up their game. Suitable for amateurs and semi-professional fighters, the Intensive Fight Camps give a concentrated burst of high quality, high energy training. Held in a self-contained martial arts complex set on five acres of mountainside on Thailand’s mountainous North Western frontier with top-quality training and accommodation facilities, it is very much the dream location for training in the mountains of the East.

Highlights

  • Training three times a day
  • Intensive training in Sanda (Chinese boxing)
  • Training in stand up fighting, K1 and kick boxing
  • Free use of the gym and training facilities
  • Breakfast and dinners included
  • 14 nights accommodation
  • 10 days with instruction
  • English
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You can either choose to stay in twin rooms or private room. All rooms face over the Pai river valley and have fantastic mountain views. All rooms have a 2m deep front terrace with chairs which serves as a living room and is very comfortable, even when the sun is hot. All rooms have good WiFi. Towels and drinking water are supplied.

Twin rooms

Twin rooms are shared between two people. Main bedroom is 4m x 3.5m plus en suite shower room (2×1.25m with heated shower and towel rail) and toilet / wash room (2×1.25m with wash basin, mirror, clothes hooks and 2 shelves).

Private rooms

Private room is 3m x 3m with en suite shower / toilet. Private rooms also have desk and wardrobe. Private rooms are set further away from the rest of the buildings and are more quiet All rooms are equipped with fan, reading lights, chairs, and plugs.

Program

Overview

You can reasonably expect that by completing a fight camp you will:

Significantly increase your punching and kicking power

Strengthen your take down defense

Gain new combinations

Increase your strength, flexibility, and stamina

Significantly improve your take down skills

Develop your breakfalls

Increase your skill in clinches and standing grapples

Tighten your defense

Be better able to switch your strikes between head, body, and legs

Adopt a more active guard

The areas and topics covered during the 2 weeks of the camp include:

Stages in preparing for a fight

How to cut weight safely and effectively

Methods to control pre fight anxiety / adrenaline rush

The mind game - adopting a winning mentality

Breathing exercises to aid recovery from training and injury

Relaxation methods

How to make the best use of the gym

You will be taught advanced training techniques which few modern day fighters know for: core strength, flexibility, and improving the accuracy of your high kicks. These techniques make a big difference, and to win you need to have an edge.

Sparring

Over the course of the two weeks you will take part in eight sparring sessions, each lasting for one hour. The instructors will be watching carefully and will give detailed feedback after each round. Sparring will be reasonably light contact in order to minimize injuries. It is optional but very much recommended - this is a chance to hone your sparring skills with a variety of new sparring partners from different martial art backgrounds and receive skilled, experienced coaching.

Schedule

Saturday, August 13th, 2016

11.00: Arrive and settle in to rooms

16.00: Guided tour of the Kung Fu Retreat

17.30: Introductory talk with Master Iain and the Nam Yang Warriors over Chinese Tea

18.15: Suggested trip to Pai town for dinner

Early night recommended ready for 6.00am start next day.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

6.00 - 7.00: Early morning run. You will be timed so that at the end of the two weeks you will know how much you have improved.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Core strength workout for overall power

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Breakfalls.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3. Master Iain Armstrong. Introduction to importance of relaxation and use of whole body when striking in order to generate maximum impact and force which penetrates into an opponent.

9.05 - 9.15: Stretch. Flexibility session with Master Iain Armstrong.

11.00: Theory session: how to stretch. An in depth talk on the most effective ways to drastically increase your flexibility. Very few people know these techniques.

11.30: Warm up.

12.00: Stretching session. During this time we will measure how flexible you are so that you will know how much you have improved at the end of the camp.

13.00: Meditation. An introduction to meditation techniques to help you win the mind game.

13.15: Finish

15.30: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen: Footwork and body positioning.

16.10: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike: Punch combinations.

16.50: Break for tea made from home­grown herbs to reduce inflammation and stiffness and speed recovery. Pad up for sparring practise.

17.00 - 18.00: Sparring session with feedback.

Monday, August 15th, 2016

6.00 - 7.00: Introduction to Chi Kung, the kung fu masters’ art of breath and energy. An amazing way to develop your breath and speed recovery after hard training. Also helps to control pre-fight stress and anxiety. A very useful tool.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Take downs (including shoot techniques).

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Punching power.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3: Master Iain Armstrong. Take down defenses

9.05 - 9.15: Stretch.

15.30: Master Iain Armstrong. How to get the best from your time in the gym.

16.10: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Punch combinations.

16.50: Break for tea made from home grown herbs to reduce inflammation and stiffness and speed recovery. Pad up for sparring practice.

17.00 -18.00: Sparring.

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

6.00 - 7.00: Running.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Core strength workout.

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Punch / takedown combinations.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3: Master Iain Armstrong. Power in punches. How to use whole body strength and coordination to maximize the power in your punches.

9.05 - 9.15: Stretch.

11.00: Warm up. Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike.

11.15: Master Iain Armstrong. Take downs. Using leverage, joint locking, balance manipulation and tendon strain to make an opponent fall.

11.50: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Take down defense.

12.25: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Punch / takedown combinations.

13.00: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Conditioning. De sensitizing drills to prepare the body to be hit.

13.15: Finish.

Master Iain Armstrong:

15.30: Uphill sprints for explosive power.

15.45: Basic strength and fitness exercise leading into full body stretch.

17.15: Break for tea made from home grown herbs to reduce inflammation and stiffness and speed recovery.

17.30: Meditation for anxiety control, focus and positive mindset.

18.00: Finish.

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016

Rest day. Optional day trip to see long neck tribe, temples, mountain views, Hill tribes etc. (Not included in price.)

Thursday, August 18th, 2016

6.00 - 7.00: Chi Kung lesson 2.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Core strength workout.

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Defence against kicks. Taking an opponent down when he kicks.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3: Master Iain Armstrong. Grappling in a clinch.

9.00 - 9.15: Stretch.

Master Iain Armstrong.

11.00: Warm up

11.20: Stretch

12.30: Kicking session: building knock out power into your kicks.

13.15: Finish

15.30: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Warm up.

15.50: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Breaking opponent’s posture – setting them up for strikes / takedowns.

16.45: Break for tea made from home grown herbs to reduce inflammation and stiffness and speed recovery. Pad up for sparring practice.

17.00: Sparring session.

18.00: Finish

Friday, August 19th, 2016

6.00 - 7.00: Running.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Punch / kick combinations.

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Knee strikes.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3: Master Iain Armstrong. Countering leg kicks, even if your shins are not rock hard.

9.05 - 9.15: Stretch.

15.30: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Warm up.

15.45: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Punch / kick combinations.

16.15: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Tempo changes, controlling the pace of the fight and using it to your advantage.

16.50: Break for tea made from home grown herbs to reduce inflammation and stiffness and speed recovery. Pad up for sparring practice.

17.00: Sparring session.

18.00: Finish

Saturday, August 20th, 2016

Rest day. Probably very much needed. A good day to get out, explore the local area and taste the local food. Or maybe just chill out and relax.

Sunday August 21st, 2016

6.00 - 7.00: Running.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Core workout.

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Kick / takedown combinations.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3: Master Iain Armstrong. Active vs passive guard. How to use your guard actively rather than just hiding behind your gloves.

9.05 - 9.15: Stretch.

Master Iain Armstrong.

11.00: Warm up

11.20: Stretch

12.30: Kicking session: Back kicks.

13.15: Finish

15.30: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Warm up

15.45: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Body movement. The hallmark of a professional fighter.

16.20: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike.

16.50: Tea break.

17.00 - 18.00: Sparring.

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

6.00 - 7.00: Chi Kung lesson 3.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen: Fight preparation. A talk by Steve on how he builds up and prepares himself to be at his physical, mental and emotional peak for a big fight.

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike: kick / takedown combinations.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3: Master Iain Armstrong. Intelligent fighting. A talk on intelligent strategies which lead to success.

9.05 - 9.15: Stretch.

15.30: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. My training program and diet. A talk by Anthony on how he maintains his strength and fitness.

16.00: Warm up. Jan.

16.15: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Grappling in a clinch.

17.00 - 18.00: Sparring.

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

6.00 - 7.00: Running.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Core workout.

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. My training program and diet. A talk by Steve on how he maintains his strength and fitness.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3: Master Iain Armstrong. Moving out of a passive guard. From a position where you have been forced to hide behind a guard, breaking out into a decisive counter attack.

9.05 - 9.15: Stretch.

11.00: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Warm up.

11.15: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Punch combinations 2.

11.55: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Punch kik combinations.

12.35: Master Iain Armstrong. Hip flexor training for improved kicking. Some really good exercises to help you kick high with accuracy, power and penetration.

1.15pm Finish.

Master Iain Armstrong:

15.30: Uphill sprints for explosive power.

15.45: Basic strength and fitness exercise leading into full body stretch.

17.15: Break for tea made from home grown herbs to reduce inflammation and stiffness and speed recovery.

17.30: Meditation for anxiety control, focus and positive mindset.

18.00pm Finish.

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Rest day. Last chance to make the most of Pai. Maybe try rafting or elephant riding or relax in the natural hot springs and soak away your aches and pains.

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

6.00 - 7.00: Chi Kung lesson 4.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Core strength training.

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. My favourite moves.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3: Master Iain Armstrong. Switching head body, opening up a guard

9.05 - ­9.15: Stretch.

11.00: Jan Dendonker. Warm up.

11.20: Jan Dendonker. Stretch. You will be re-measured to see how much your flexibility has improved.

12.30: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Kicking session.

13.15: Finish

15.30: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. How I train strength. (talk).

16.00: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen: Knees. A whole session on crippling knee techniques.

16.45: Break for tea made from home grown herbs to reduce inflammation and stiffness and speed recovery.

17.00: Sparring session.

18.00: Finish

Friday, August 26th, 2016

6.00 - 7.00am Running. You will be timed to see how much faster you can complete the course.

7.00: Session 1: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Clinching.

7.35: Session 2: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. The rule of three! Building a pattern in your opponent’s mind then breaking it.

8.10: Break for Chinese tea.

8.25: Session 3: Master Iain Armstrong. Coming out of clinch / takedown attempts into punches

9.05 - 9.15: Stretch.

15.30: Nam Yang Warrior Steve Keen. Cutting weight. (Talk).

15.50: Master Iain Armstrong. The mind game. (talk)

16.15: Break for tea made from home grown herbs to reduce inflammation and stiffness and speed recovery.

16.30: Nam Yang Warrior Anthony Kannike. Warm up

16.45: Sparring session.

17.45: Summary. Presentation of certificates etc.

18.00: Finish

19.30: A night out in Pai.

Saturday, August 27th, 2016

Return to Chiang Mai. Go to Thai Boxing in evening then a last night out in Chiang Mai.

Martial Arts

Sanda (Chinese boxing)

Chinese boxing is particularly famous for its take downs, sweeps, and throws. Chinese boxers are recognized as some of the best fighters in the world when it comes to catching kicks or dodging punches, and then dropping their opponent to the floor. Training differs according to the level / experience of the fighter:

Basic level: mastering punches, kicks and takedowns; building power, accuracy and stamina; conditioning to take blows.

Intermediate level: co-ordinating with an opponent; reading intention; feinting; evading.

Advanced level: sparring with a partner.

Typical training sessions involve:

Evading / blocking / countering an opponent’s techniques

Punching / kicking focus mitts / punch bags / tire dummies

Applying sweeps, throws and takedowns

Strength, stamina, flexibility training

Body conditioning exercises in preparation to take blows

At Nam Yang, Chinese boxing is taught together with Shaolin Kung Fu and Chi Kung. Kung Fu provides body toughness and explosive power, while Chi Kung speeds recovery after hard training, which both complement Sanda.

Chi Kung

Many of us are vaguely aware of the great benefits of Chi Kung meditation to our health and longevity but don’t really understand how it works. Here is an overview:

Chi circulates around our bodies, in a daily cycle, mainly but not entirely through pathways called meridians and vessels.

Chi is stored in energy centres / reservoirs called tan tiens.

The two main sources of chi are the Earth (yin chi) and the sky (yang chi).

When the chi in our bodies is circulating freely, and is balanced between yin and yang, we will enjoy good health.

Opening the meridians through stretching exercises and guiding chi through them facilitates strong, smooth circulation of the chi.

Drawing in fresh chi from the earth and sky keeps our chi plentiful and allows us to balance yin and yang.

Expelling stale or excess chi keeps our chi fresh and prevents it becoming excessively strong.

By its nature, Chi Kung (also known as Qi Gong or Ki Gung) is simple and easy yet amazingly effective. Anyone can practice it successfully, regardless of age or fitness. The essential requirements are a properly trained instructor and good, fresh air. The basic Chi Kung system taught is Tong Ling (clearing and circulating) Chi Kung. The system can be learned in one month - less with intensive private tuition - but takes time to practice. However, benefits can be felt immediately.

Nam Yang Kung Fu Retreat

The Nam Yang Pugilistic Association is one of the world’s oldest Traditional Chinese Shaolin Temple Martial Arts schools. Nam Yang teaches Southern Shaolin Martial Arts styles, including Tiger-Crane Kung Fu and Shaolin Weapons systems, Hard and Soft Chi Kung, Lion and Dragon Dancing and Shuang Yang Pei Ho or the Sun and Frost White Crane Soft Internal Art. Nam Yang has trained students to become world ranked martial artists and their Lion and Dragon Dance teams perform around the world.

  • Master Iain Armstrong

    Master Iain is a Kung Fu philosopher and author with 36 years of living Kung Fu. Trained personally by Grand Master Tan Soh Tin in Singapore, he’s a two-time world champion and veteran of real street battles. Famous for his high-quality Kung Fu teaching, his instructional films and magazine articles, and for his demonstrations of Iron Shirt Chi Kung, Master Iain is a mine of information but retains a very practical, down to earth, and realistic approach. Most people who meet him are struck by his air of calm, patience, and wisdom.

Kung Fu Retreat School

The mountain retreat is designed to be the ultimate martial arts training and meditation venue. It is set on 2.1 acres of land on the side of a mountain spur, bordering the jungle and maintaining awesome views across the Pai river valley to mountains which rise steadily to the Himalayas. In the early morning, when you begin training, the mountains are usually shrouded in mist which gradually clears as the sun rises. The school is built in the local Shan style architecture according to Chinese Feng Shui principles.

Pai

Why did Nam Yang choose Pai for their location? There are several reasons. Thailand is a great country. It is one of the most popular destinations for international travelers. If you are going to stay somewhere, why not stay somewhere really nice? Thailand is close enough to Singapore that their top masters can travel easily.

The North of Thailand has some of the very best chi in the world. It flows down from the Himalayas. This makes for a perfect place to practice Chi Kung and seriously boosts health and vitality. This was the primary reason for choosing the location of Nam Yang.

The Pai valley is an area of incredible natural beauty. High in the mountains, it epitomises the Kung Fu dream of training in pure, fresh air with awesome views well away from the distractions of modern life and the pollution of modern cities. It is easy to grow and prepare healthy, natural food in the farmland around Pai and this allows you to eat the sort of diet which best supports our training.

Thailand is a fairly economical country in which to operate. It is not the cheapest in the world but is very cheap compared to western countries, yet just as fun. Pai is a really fun town. Whilst Nam Yang is set in quiet, peaceful surroundings, many westerners like to party now and again, and Pai is the perfect place.

The Pai district is popular with tourists because there is so much to do here. You will have two days off each week and have a fairly long break from training in the middle of the day - hence a stay at the mountain retreat can be a holiday as well as a training experience.

Nam Yang Mountain Retreat is located in the foothills of the mountains overlooking the Pai river valley in the northern part of Mae Hong Son, Thailand’s remote North Western province. Mae Hong Son translates as ‘the land of mist’. It is dominated by fairly high, forested mountains and is sparsely inhabited, mainly by Thailand’s famous hill tribes.

It is about a 15 minute walk from the outskirts of the town of Pai to Nam Yang, and about a 30 minute walk from the town center. Motorcycle taxis can be used to travel to and from town and cost very little. Hence living at the mountain retreat gives a feeling of isolation in a very rural, mountain community, but fun adventures are always right around the corner.

Surroundings / Environment

To the South and West forested mountains rise steadily. To the North East, the mountain retreat overlooks the wide Pai river valley which houses much lush farmland and, of course, the town of Pai as well as many small farming villages. Past the valley, the mountains rise again. North and South more foothills rise from the river valley towards the mountains.

In practical terms, this means getting up in the morning to practise your Chi Kung facing East over the valley, which is often shrouded in mist, towards the rising sun and breathing in cool, fresh mountain air; continuing until the sun gets too hot; resting during the hottest part of the day then watching the sun set over the Western mountains as you begin your evening training session. For most of us, this is pretty much the Kung Fu ideal.

Climate

The seasons in Pai are quite distinct and vary as follows:

November - January

Winter season. Dry. Warm in middle of day and afternoon. Night time cold enough to require hat and scarf. Mist hangs on the mountains later in the mornings than at other times of year. Views in the morning amazing! A very good time to come.

February - April.

Hot season. Dry. Daytime becoming progressively hotter, peaking in mid April (Songkran,Thai new year). Air cooler at night and before about 10.00am, middle of day hot. Land tends to look a bit dusty and at its least green. Can get smoky from farming activity. Pai is at its least attractive at this time of year.

May - June.

Early rainy season. Occasional rain. Air a little more humid. Daytime can be cooler if there is cloud cover, night time warmer because of higher humidity. Land looks beautifully green. Clouds often sit on the mountains creating awesome views.

July - August.

Peak rainy season: about half of the days will see some rain but may only be for a short time. Rivers and streams at their highest, waterfalls most impressive. Temperatures moderated by cloud cover and humidity. Training will often have to take place under cover. Plants at their most green and lush. Arguably the best time of year to come.

September - October.

Late rainy season. Rains dying down but land still beautifully green, streams and rivers full. Warm and humid. Views still awesome. A very popular time.

Summary:

November to January dry, hot in day but cool at night. Most popular time of year to visit Pai. Perfect if you do not like rain.

June to October rainy, but not everyday. Humid. Not too hot in daytime, warm but not hot at night. Views at their best, particularly later in the rainy season.

February to April hot and dry.

May intermediate between hot season and rainy season.

Pai is the main tourist center in Mae Hong Son province and ideally suited to receive and entertain foreigners. It has a population of about 3000 who, at peak times, are heavily outnumbered by tourists, mainly backpackers (for whom Pai is almost a compulsory stop) and the more adventurous Thai and foreign tourists who have braved the minibus ride through the mountains.

Pai acts as a hub for activities and excursions, such as trekking (usually with overnight stay at a hill tribe village), elephant riding, caving, ox cart riding, rafting, off road driving/motorcycling and visiting waterfalls, temples, hill tribes, etc. The favorite way to get around for most is to rent a small motorcycle for about 80 Baht (2.50 USD) per day.

It contains a multitude of bars and restaurants, all very reasonably priced (modest meal for two less than 100 Baht), many market stalls selling local food and goods, and shops selling any supplies you are really likely to need - and even a few small super markets. Of particular note are stalls run by local hill tribe people selling clothing, handicrafts, fruit, etc. As you would expect in Thailand, the town also boasts a number of beautiful Buddhist temples run by monks.

Activities
  • Caving nearby
  • Elephant riding nearby
  • Hiking nearby
  • Massage nearby
  • Mountain walking/trekking nearby
  • Off road driving/motorcycling
  • Ox cart riding nearby
  • Rafting nearby
  • Trekking nearby
  • Waterfalls nearby
General
  • Dining area
  • Environmentally friendly
  • Garden
  • Kitchen
  • Meditation garden
  • Multilingual staff
  • Night club nearby
  • River nearby
Services
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Scooter rental nearby
  • Toiletries

Breakfast and dinner are provided. Since there is usually a rather long break mid-day, and students can use that time to go out of the Retreat and explore the local area, lunch is not included. However, lunch can also be arranged for you for a surcharge.

Quality food is essential for martial artists in hard training. The Retreat have their own kitchen garden, herb garden, and fruit trees. They are fully self sufficient for rice and papaya and largely self sufficient for vegetables. They also produce a fair amount of fruit, according to season. What they don’t grow ourselves, they choose carefully. They prepare local style food but use selected medicinal herbs to improve its value.

The diet is calculated to best support your Kung Fu training. Food prepared on site is as fresh, organic, and healthy as possible and is usually delicious local Thai or Shan style, or sometimes Chinese or southern Thai style.

Meals start with one or two types of fruit and possibly some salad, then typically two main dishes with rice. Most dishes are vegetarian but some meat and fish are also served. There will always be at least one vegetarian dish with each meal. The Retreat try their best to cater for specialist diets. For most of the guests, the food is one of the highlights of their stay. Drinking water is supplied free with meals and is available from the kitchen free of charge at any time for resident students.

The instructors eat in the dining area, together with the students, which is testimony to the quality of the food and helps provide a good ethos for the school. Meal times are therefore ideal for discussing Kung Fu and asking questions.

Almost any style of food can be purchased in Pai (Italian, western, middle eastern, Chinese, Indian, etc). The local diet is based mainly around rice, meat, fresh-water fish, vegetables, fruit, and spices. However, seafood is relatively expensive in the mountains. Local fruit and vegetables are great, fresh and very cheap.

Buddhist temples

Local activities: trekking, hiking, elephant riding, ox-cart riding, etc.

Thai massage

Waterfalls

  • 13 nights accommodation
  • Breakfast and dinner, fresh and healthy
  • Free drinking water any time
  • Training daily in Kung Fu, Sanda, Chi Kung, meditation, etc.
  • Airfare travel
  • Lunch
  • Miscellaneous expenses (including excursions)
  • Travel insurance

Arrival by airplane

Fly to Bangkok or Chiang Mai. Chiang Mai is much nearer to the Kung Fu Retreat but Bangkok has more flights and is usually cheaper. There is an abundance of hotels, guest houses etc in Bangkok to suit all budgets, should you need to arrange an overnight stay. Once in Bangkok, you can book another flight from Bangkok to Chiang Mai.

Once in Chiang Mai, take the 25-minute flight to Pai. When you first arrive in Pai, the easiest way to get to Kung Fu Retreat is simply to book a taxi. The taxis are a little way up the main street from the AYA service office. Motorcycle is the cheapest taxi and should cost less than 100 Baht. For a minibus/car, it will be 200 - 250 THB. Ask for Kung Fu or Kun Iain/Kun Pu. If in doubt, ask the driver to call 0864 286 739 for directions in Thai.

Directions: Head out of town towards the airport/Mae Hong Son. On the far side of the airport, turn right, parallel to the runway. The Nam Yang Kung Fu Retreat is the first turn on the left, about 400m down the road, on a right hand bend with a prominent sign.

Arrival by train/minibus

Arrive in Bangkok. Once there, you can get an overnight sleeper train from Bangkok’s central station, Hua Lam Phong, for a little over 1000 Baht each way.

Booking in advance is recommended. Please be aware that trains in Thailand often run very late. The trains are very comfortable and afford great views of the Thai countryside. Once in Chiang Mai, take a minibus to Pai.

Minibus trip costs about 200 Baht and has awesome views. It takes about three and a half hours, most of which is spent on amazing winding roads through mountains the like of which you have probably never seen before. The views are breath taking and the journey is an adventure in its self so we recommend that you travel during daylight. The most popular minibus provider is AYA service. Their office in Chiang Mai is opposite the train station. Book on to the next available minibus if you have not booked already.

Minibuses run between about 7.30 am and 5.00pm. If you arrive in Chiang Mai later than about 3.30pm, you are likely to need to either stay overnight in Chiang Mai or get a taxi to the Kung Fu Retreat. If staying overnight, which is the cheapest option, it is recommended that you still go to the AYA service office when you arrive and book on to a minibus for the next day. Then look for a guesthouse nearby. You should get a nice room with fan for 400 - 500 Baht.

Once in Pai, it's easiest to take a taxi to the retreat.

Arrival by minibus

Arrive in Bangkok. If you are on a very tight budget, you can go to Khao San Road in Bangkok and get an overnight coach to Chiang Mai for about 300 Baht or so. This is the least comfortable way to travel. Once in Chiang Mai, take a minibus to Pai.

Minibus trip costs about 200 Baht and has awesome views. It takes about three and a half hours, most of which is spent on amazing winding roads through mountains the like of which you have probably never seen before. The views are breath taking and the journey is an adventure in its self so we recommend that you travel during daylight. The most popular minibus provider is AYA service. Their office in Chiang Mai is opposite the train station. Book on to the next available minibus if you have not booked already.

Minibuses run between about 7.30 am and 5.00pm. If you arrive in Chiang Mai later than about 3.30pm, you are likely to need to either stay overnight in Chiang Mai or get a taxi to the Kung Fu Retreat. If staying overnight, which is the cheapest option, it is recommended that you still go to the AYA service office when you arrive and book on to a minibus for the next day. Then look for a guesthouse nearby. You should get a nice room with fan for 400 - 500 Baht.

Once in Pai, it's easiest to take a taxi to the retreat.

Arrival by taxi

Arrive at Chiang Mai airport. Nam Yang can arrange for a taxi to come to the airport to meet you. Alternatively you could speak with drivers in the taxi rank outside the airport. Recently taxis have been charging about 3,200 Baht for the trip. This does vary and will likely be higher if late at night or in December/January. If you arrange a taxi through Nam Yang, they will need to pay in advance so do not pay the driver otherwise he will think that he has just got the best tip of his life and likely take a week off! If you do want to give a tip, 100 - 250 Baht would be about right.

Pai, Thailand

Nam Yang Kung Fu is a residential martial arts training and retreat, offering Kung Fu for combat and self-defense and Chi Kung and meditation for health.

  • Availability: The Training Camps of this organizer are available 100% of the time.

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